Meat and Agriculture on Lift Big Eat Big (LBEB)

I have followed Brandon at Lift Big Eat Big (LBEB) on Instagram for awhile now. His Instagram channel will delight foodies, agriculturalists, health and fitness buffs of all levels… well basically everyone! Brandon asked me to write up an article for his website on myths in agriculture, so I did. In turn, I have asked Brandon to answer a few questions for me – stay tuned, you will see more from him.

Until then, head over to the LBEB webpage and check out my article, as well as all of the other great information. Like what you see? Sign up to receive the newsletter.

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Dr. Lindsay can also be found on:

– Website (http://food.unl.edu/ag-and-food)
– Twitter/Instagram (agwithdrlindsay)
– Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/agwithdrlindsay)
– Pinterest (Lindsay Chichester-Medahunsi)

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Stanford releases literature review of organic foods

Ryan at Agriculture Proud has a post I wanted to share…
A literature review released by Standford University indicates that organic foods do not offer significant safety or health benefits over conventionally produced food. It is important to understand all of the facts so you can make the best decisions for your family when it comes to purchasing food.

Beef Runner

Labeling for products that meet the USDA-NOP s...

Earlier this week, a journal on Internal Medicine released a review from Stanford University which concluded that there are no significant health or safety benefits of choosing organic over conventionally grown foods.

This is different from previous papers in that it is a review of recent, relevant studies, instead of a research study in itself. The group from Stanford looked at 237 studies analyzing the benefits and dangers of eating organic vs conventionally grown food products. What they found upset many proponents of organics who use health reasons for their choices.

Study on benefits of organic foods is misleading, consumer group argues – CBS News

Stanford Scientists Cast Doubt on Advantages of Organic Meat and ProduceNew York Times

Study Says Organic Isn’t Healthier? Here’s Why It Still May Be Worth The Cost – Forbes

I won’t muddle through the details of the review or debate the details. This…

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10 Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget

My colleague, Kayla Colgrove, shares how easy it can be to eat healthy on a budget, as well as tricks to make eating healthy easier. I like meal planning and preparing stuff for lunches on the weekends too. Which of these tips do you like?

10 Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget.

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Dr. Lindsay can also be found on:

– Website (http://food.unl.edu/ag-and-food)
– Twitter/Instagram (agwithdrlindsay)
– Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/agwithdrlindsay)
– Pinterest (Lindsay Chichester-Medahunsi)

Avian Influenza-Nebraska Update

Avian Influenza has been a catastrophic event for the poultry industry across the U.S. Jenny has summarized the message we are getting in Nebraska, but I think it is applicable to poultry farmers and consumers everywhere.

JenREESources's Extension Blog

Dr. Sheila Purdum, Nebraska Extension Poultry Specialist asked us to share the following

Photo courtesy Nebraska Extension Poultry page: https://animalscience.unl.edu/anscextensionpoultry Photo courtesy Nebraska Extension Poultry website.

information about avian influenza.  Unfortunately, Nebraska has HPAI H5N2 in a commercial flock of laying hens in Dixon County. This is the same virus that has been infecting turkeys in MN and WI and laying hens in the state of IA for the past 3 months. It is a deadly flu virus to poultry, killing as many as 90% of the flock within 3 days of the first symptoms. The major source of the virus has been migrating waterfowl, but it is believed to be airborne now traveling on numerous vectors to include people’s clothing, vehicles and other animals that may have come into contact with migrating waterfowl excrement, dust, etc.

Biosecurity:

The good news is that Biosecurity measures such as disinfecting all equipment coming into contact with your bird’s environment…

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10 Things You May Not Know About GMOs

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are a huge advancement in agricultural technology. Wanda wrote a great blog post about some of the most common misconceptions about GMOs.

10 Things You May Not Know About GMOs.

What questions do you still have? What information can I provide to you about GMOs?

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Dr. Lindsay can also be found on:

– Website (http://food.unl.edu/ag-and-food)
– Twitter/Instagram (agwithdrlindsay)
– Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/agwithdrlindsay)
– Pinterest (Lindsay Chichester-Medahunsi)

Trust but Verify…

Please take a moment to read Anne’s post today, and sign up for her blog if you do not yet follow it. Anne is a very well respected cattle feedlot owner and operator, who is very hands-on with all day-to-day activities. Anne spends a lot of time sharing what she does on her feedlot via this blog and through various public venues. Thanks Anne for what you do!

Feed Yard Foodie

I did an interview last week with a reporter who asked,Why does your farm participate in 3rd party animal welfare audits?”

My answer: I ask that my customers trust me to be a good farmer, but I open my farm to auditing so that they can verify that I practice what I preach.

No matter how good a job you do on your farm, an audit is a stressful time.

  • Hundreds of pages of documents are checked to make sure that records accurately demonstrate daily animal care practices.
  • Hours are spent checking the farm’s facilities (feed and feed mixing areas, cattle pens, water tanks, and corrals) to ensure that animals have good living conditions.
  • Cattle handling is observed to ensure that good welfare exists while animals are interacting with their human caregivers.
  • Caregivers are asked questions about farm protocols on many different issues relative to animal care…

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Sensitive Issues Training-Engage

Jenny does a great job explaining the Engage Training and shared values messages from the conference we hosted. In the days to come I will share with you some of the information provided by Specialists on topics such as sustainability, carbon footprints, green house gas emissions, biotechnology, and more.

JenREESources's Extension Blog

Many of us have been there…we’ve been asked a question in which the answer can be deemed controversial because the topic is based on emotion and beliefs.  How do we respond?  Do we get caught up in the emotion and passion of the issue and try to force our beliefs on others?  Do we shy away or try to avoid an answer altogether by remaining silent?

Last week’s Sensitive Issues Media and Communications Training was developed to help all of us through these situations.  It was a remarkable experience working with an amazing group of ladies, all passionate about food, but looking at food from a variety of perspectives and taking an issues-based approach in developing our team.  Our team was comprised of a livestock expert, a manure expert, two food and nutrition experts, a communication’s expert, and myself from a crop production perspective.  Special thanks to Dr. Chuck Hibberd…

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Glyphosate and cancer: What does the data say?

Dr. Andrew Kniss, University of Wyoming Assistant Professor, recently discussed Glyphosate and cancer: What does the data say? I encourage you to check it out and to follow up on some of the links he provides for further information. At this time there is no major cause for alarm, as the vast majority of persons are not exposed to glyphosate.

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Dr. Lindsay can also be found on:

– Website (http://food.unl.edu/ag-and-food)
– Twitter/Instagram (agwithdrlindsay)
– Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/agwithdrlindsay)
– Pinterest (Lindsay Chichester-Medahunsi)

Just How Safe Is Your Organic Food?

Is organic food safer, healthier, or more nutritious than conventionally produced food? Research indicates there are no significant differences. Rhonda at Iowa Meets Maui does a very nice job of discussing this issue.

A Single Person’s Guide to the Grocery Store

Elise does a great job in her blog post discussing tips on shopping and cooking for one. In our household of two, we cook regular size meals and have leftovers for lunch. I often freeze leftovers too and enjoy the flexibility to pull them out of the freezer in portion sized servings when no one feels like cooking or time is short. The Hubs and I also started planning our meals the week before. We grocery shop for just those items, and it decreases the chance that food will spoil as we know we will use it within the next week.

The Kiwi Hoosier

My favorite food from the dining courts. I would be okay with someone buying me a Purdue waffle (Boiler)maker. My favorite food from the dining courts. I would be perfectly okay with someone finding me a Purdue waffle (Boiler)maker.

For nearly nine years, I’ve lived on my own. I’ve had various roommates in houses and apartments, and I’ve lived in the university residence halls, eating dining hall meals, microwavable dinners or fast food. However, for a year and a half, I lived with only my dog, Evie. (She eats most anything.) I found the food situation to be vastly different when I lived alone than when I lived with roommates.

During this year and a half, I lived in the country, and greatly enjoyed it. I worked in the city but didn’t want to have to stop at the grocery store every day because of bad planning. When I lived on the farm, we only went to the grocery store once or twice a month for all five of us. I liked that approach.

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